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Poetry for Children
Poetry Break #7

A poem by Jack Prelutsky

Louder than a Clap of Thunder!
by Jack Prelutsky

Louder than a clap of thunder,
louder than an eagle screams,
louder than a dragon blunders,
or a dozen football teams,
louder than a four-alarmer,
or a rushing waterfall,
louder than a knight in armor
jumping from a ten-foot wall.

Louder than an earthquake rumbles,
louder than a tidal wave,
louder than an ogre grumbles
as he stumbles through his cave,
louder than stampeding cattle,
louder than a cannon roars,
louder than a giant's rattle,
that's how loud my father SNORES!

The New Kid on the Block; Greenwillow, 1984

Introduction
This poem is a list of loud noises. If possible, take the children outside to brainstorm a list of loud things they can think of. (Kids can get VERY loud here, so beware.)

Extension
With the repeated use of the word "louder," this poem is perfect for audience participation. Once you have shared the poem orally (and the children are familiar with all the vocabulary), read it again with the audience providing the word, "louder." Have them start softly, but say the word a bit louder each time, until they nearly shout the last line. (Remember to go outside beforehand, if possible.)